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Balancing macronutrient intake in a mammalian carnivore: disentangling the influences of flavour and nutrition

Overview of attention for article published in Royal Society Open Science, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 4,772)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
115 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
186 X users
facebook
12 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
Title
Balancing macronutrient intake in a mammalian carnivore: disentangling the influences of flavour and nutrition
Published in
Royal Society Open Science, June 2016
DOI 10.1098/rsos.160081
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adrian K. Hewson-Hughes, Alison Colyer, Stephen J. Simpson, David Raubenheimer

Abstract

There is a large body of research demonstrating that macronutrient balancing is a primary driver of foraging in herbivores and omnivores, and more recently, it has been shown to occur in carnivores. However, the extent to which macronutrient selection in carnivores may be influenced by organoleptic properties (e.g. flavour/aroma) remains unknown. Here, we explore the roles of nutritional and hedonic factors in food choice and macronutrient balancing in a mammalian carnivore, the domestic cat. Using the geometric framework, we determined the amounts and ratio of protein and fat intake in cats allowed to select from combinations of three foods that varied in protein : fat (P : F) composition (approx. 10 : 90, 40 : 60 and 70 : 30 on a per cent energy basis) to which flavours of different 'attractiveness' (fish, rabbit and orange) were added. In two studies, in which animal and plant protein sources were used, respectively, the ratio and amounts of protein and fat intake were very consistent across all groups regardless of flavour combination, indicating regulation of both protein and fat intake. Our results suggest that macronutrient balancing rather than hedonistic rewards based on organoleptic properties of food is a primary driver of longer-term food selection and intake in domestic cats.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 186 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Other 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Master 4 6%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 19 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 32%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 11 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 19 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1064. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2024.
All research outputs
#14,535
of 25,385,509 outputs
Outputs from Royal Society Open Science
#33
of 4,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#211
of 353,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Royal Society Open Science
#2
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,385,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,772 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 353,710 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.