↓ Skip to main content

Universals and cultural diversity in the expression of gratitude

Overview of attention for article published in Royal Society Open Science, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 1,596)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
87 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
499 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Universals and cultural diversity in the expression of gratitude
Published in
Royal Society Open Science, May 2018
DOI 10.1098/rsos.180391
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simeon Floyd, Giovanni Rossi, Julija Baranova, Joe Blythe, Mark Dingemanse, Kobin H. Kendrick, Jörg Zinken, N. J. Enfield, Floyd, Simeon, Rossi, Giovanni, Baranova, Julija, Blythe, Joe, Dingemanse, Mark, Kendrick, Kobin H., Zinken, Jörg, Enfield, N. J.

Abstract

Gratitude is argued to have evolved to motivate and maintain social reciprocity among people, and to be linked to a wide range of positive effects-social, psychological and even physical. But is socially reciprocal behaviour dependent on the expression of gratitude, for example by saying 'thank you' as in English? Current research has not included cross-cultural elements, and has tended to conflate gratitude as an emotion with gratitude as a linguistic practice, as might appear to be the case in English. Here, we ask to what extent people express gratitude in different societies by focusing on episodes of everyday life where someone seeks and obtains a good, service or support from another, comparing these episodes across eight languages from five continents. We find that expressions of gratitude in these episodes are remarkably rare, suggesting that social reciprocity in everyday life relies on tacit understandings of rights and duties surrounding mutual assistance and collaboration. At the same time, we also find minor cross-cultural variation, with slightly higher rates in Western European languages English and Italian, showing that universal tendencies of social reciprocity should not be equated with more culturally variable practices of expressing gratitude. Our study complements previous experimental and culture-specific research on gratitude with a systematic comparison of audiovisual corpora of naturally occurring social interaction from different cultures from around the world.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 499 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 30%
Unspecified 4 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 7%
Other 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 26%
Unspecified 5 19%
Linguistics 5 19%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Other 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 999. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2018.
All research outputs
#2,953
of 11,949,665 outputs
Outputs from Royal Society Open Science
#7
of 1,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195
of 256,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Royal Society Open Science
#2
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,949,665 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,596 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,712 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.