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Two waves of colonization straddling the K–Pg boundary formed the modern reef fish fauna

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
22 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
Title
Two waves of colonization straddling the K–Pg boundary formed the modern reef fish fauna
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.0321
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. A. Price, L. Schmitz, C. E. Oufiero, R. I. Eytan, A. Dornburg, W. L. Smith, M. Friedman, T. J. Near, P. C. Wainwright

Abstract

Living reef fishes are one of the most diverse vertebrate assemblages on Earth. Despite its prominence and ecological importance, the origins and assembly of the reef fish fauna is poorly described. A patchy fossil record suggests that the major colonization of reef habitats must have occurred in the Late Cretaceous and early Palaeogene, with the earliest known modern fossil coral reef fish assemblage dated to 50 Ma. Using a phylogenetic approach, we analysed the early evolutionary dynamics of modern reef fishes. We find that reef lineages successively colonized reef habitats throughout the Late Cretaceous and early Palaeogene. Two waves of invasion were accompanied by increasing morphological convergence: one in the Late Cretaceous from 90 to 72 Ma and the other immediately following the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. The surge in reef invasions after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary continued for 10 Myr, after which the pace of transitions to reef habitats slowed. Combined, these patterns match a classic niche-filling scenario: early transitions to reefs were made rapidly by morphologically distinct lineages and were followed by a decrease in the rate of invasions and eventual saturation of morphospace. Major alterations in reef composition, distribution and abundance, along with shifts in climate and oceanic currents, occurred during the Late Cretaceous and early Palaeogene interval. A causal mechanism between these changes and concurrent episodes of reef invasion remains obscure, but what is clear is that the broad framework of the modern reef fish fauna was in place within 10 Myr of the end-Cretaceous extinction.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 6%
Germany 3 3%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 108 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 21%
Researcher 23 19%
Student > Master 18 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Other 25 21%
Unknown 8 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 55%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 18 15%
Environmental Science 17 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Sports and Recreations 2 2%
Other 3 3%
Unknown 10 8%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2015.
All research outputs
#970,094
of 25,997,855 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,270
of 11,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,984
of 241,217 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#43
of 165 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,997,855 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,481 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,217 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 165 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.