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Molecular and fossil evidence place the origin of cichlid fishes long after Gondwanan rifting

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, November 2013
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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23 X users
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3 Facebook pages
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1 Wikipedia page
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1 YouTube creator

Citations

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168 Dimensions

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288 Mendeley
Title
Molecular and fossil evidence place the origin of cichlid fishes long after Gondwanan rifting
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, November 2013
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.1733
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matt Friedman, Benjamin P. Keck, Alex Dornburg, Ron I. Eytan, Christopher H. Martin, C. Darrin Hulsey, Peter C. Wainwright, Thomas J. Near

Abstract

Cichlid fishes are a key model system in the study of adaptive radiation, speciation and evolutionary developmental biology. More than 1600 cichlid species inhabit freshwater and marginal marine environments across several southern landmasses. This distributional pattern, combined with parallels between cichlid phylogeny and sequences of Mesozoic continental rifting, has led to the widely accepted hypothesis that cichlids are an ancient group whose major biogeographic patterns arose from Gondwanan vicariance. Although the Early Cretaceous (ca 135 Ma) divergence of living cichlids demanded by the vicariance model now represents a key calibration for teleost molecular clocks, this putative split pre-dates the oldest cichlid fossils by nearly 90 Myr. Here, we provide independent palaeontological and relaxed-molecular-clock estimates for the time of cichlid origin that collectively reject the antiquity of the group required by the Gondwanan vicariance scenario. The distribution of cichlid fossil horizons, the age of stratigraphically consistent outgroup lineages to cichlids and relaxed-clock analysis of a DNA sequence dataset consisting of 10 nuclear genes all deliver overlapping estimates for crown cichlid origin centred on the Palaeocene (ca 65-57 Ma), substantially post-dating the tectonic fragmentation of Gondwana. Our results provide a revised macroevolutionary time scale for cichlids, imply a role for dispersal in generating the observed geographical distribution of this important model clade and add to a growing debate that questions the dominance of the vicariance paradigm of historical biogeography.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 288 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
Brazil 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 272 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 66 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 65 23%
Student > Master 46 16%
Student > Bachelor 28 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 5%
Other 37 13%
Unknown 33 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 180 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 20 7%
Environmental Science 16 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 <1%
Other 9 3%
Unknown 38 13%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2024.
All research outputs
#2,227,241
of 25,587,485 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#4,363
of 11,388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,488
of 229,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#69
of 138 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,587,485 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,388 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 138 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.