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Bringing ecology blogging into the scientific fold: measuring reach and impact of science community blogs

Overview of attention for article published in Royal Society Open Science, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
8 blogs
twitter
195 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Bringing ecology blogging into the scientific fold: measuring reach and impact of science community blogs
Published in
Royal Society Open Science, October 2017
DOI 10.1098/rsos.170957
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manu E. Saunders, Meghan A. Duffy, Stephen B. Heard, Margaret Kosmala, Simon R. Leather, Terrence P. McGlynn, Jeff Ollerton, Amy L. Parachnowitsch

Abstract

The popularity of science blogging has increased in recent years, but the number of academic scientists who maintain regular blogs is limited. The role and impact of science communication blogs aimed at general audiences is often discussed, but the value of science community blogs aimed at the academic community has largely been overlooked. Here, we focus on our own experiences as bloggers to argue that science community blogs are valuable to the academic community. We use data from our own blogs (n = 7) to illustrate some of the factors influencing reach and impact of science community blogs. We then discuss the value of blogs as a standalone medium, where rapid communication of scholarly ideas, opinions and short observational notes can enhance scientific discourse, and discussion of personal experiences can provide indirect mentorship for junior researchers and scientists from underrepresented groups. Finally, we argue that science community blogs can be treated as a primary source and provide some key points to consider when citing blogs in peer-reviewed literature.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 195 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 23%
Student > Master 7 13%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Other 16 30%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 45%
Environmental Science 8 15%
Social Sciences 7 13%
Unspecified 6 11%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 164. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2018.
All research outputs
#63,288
of 11,467,388 outputs
Outputs from Royal Society Open Science
#106
of 1,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,730
of 265,919 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Royal Society Open Science
#13
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,467,388 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,474 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,919 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.